TEI

TEI publishes brief on data system improvement

Now available! TEI created a brief explaining how Tribal Home Visiting grantees have been supported in strengthening data system capacity. The brief includes three grantee case studies.


Data System Brief

Supporting Data Systems Improvement in Tribal Home Visiting: Capacity Built and Lessons Learned

For tribal nations, effective data systems are critical to report progress to funders and support governance and sovereignty. As demonstrated through the Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (the Tribal Home Visiting Program), federal agencies can provide American Indian and Alaska Native programs with innovative technical assistance (TA) and resources to strengthen data systems in furtherance of indigenous data sovereignty. To explain how the Administration for Children and Families has supported Tribal Home Visiting grantees in addressing data system challenges, this brief presents the following:

  • An overview of data system challenges and needs for tribal programs
  • A summary of data system TA and resources provided to Tribal Home Visiting grantees
  • Case studies of the ways TA support improved data system capacity
  • Recommendations for providing data system TA unique to tribal programs

Click here to access and download the brief.


CQI Tools

CQI Tools

Quality Improvement Team Charter

A team charter is a useful tool for pulling your CQI team together. The purpose of a team charter is to lay out the roles and responsibilities for each team member and lay the foundation of how your team will work together on CQI projects. This Charter tool includes examples of partnership principles and helpful communication plan elements.

Plan-Do-Study-Act Planning Tool

The Plan-Do-Study-Act Planning Tool is intended to help you think through the important details of a PDSA cycle. The tool should be used in preparation for testing a change and revisited once the test is completed to document what was learned and what your team’s next steps will be (i.e., repeat the test, add the change to your program’s process, abandon the change).

Review our sample PDSA Planning Tool with instructions provided in each of the fields.

Smart Aim Worksheet*

Your team can use Smart Aim criteria to make clear statements about what you are going to improve in your CQI project. Using these criteria helps you to be concise and specific as you plan your test of change. Smart aims are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and timebound. Attached is a Smart Aim worksheet from the Embracing Quality in Public Health: A Practitioner’s Quality Improvement Guidebook.

Process Mapping Overview

A process map is a tool to understand how an existing process works or to identify how a new process should work. Process mapping can be helpful to your team’s CQI work, as you focus on improving existing program processes. This overview provides the benefits of process mapping, and the types, examples, and steps for completing process maps.

Fishbone Diagram

A fishbone diagram is a tool used to conduct a root cause analysis during the planning phase of a CQI project. It can help your team to better understand why a problem occurs (the root cause) and prevent you from jumping to a solution before fully understanding the cause. This tool provides steps for completing a fishbone diagram, strategies for success, an example, and a fillable diagram to get you started.

*Scamarcia-Tews, D., Heany, J, Jones, J., VanDerMoere, R., Madamala, K. (2012).Embracing Quality in Public Health: A Practitioner’s Quality Improvement Guidebook. Retrieved from: https://www.miophi.org/embracing-quality-in-public-health/qi-guidebook/


TEI Publishes Five Briefs on Tribal Evaluation

Rigorous Evaluation in Tribal Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting: A Series of Briefs

TEI developed five evaluation briefs to share the story of the Tribal Home Visiting grantees’ rigorous evaluations and provide recommendations for those who oversee evaluations with tribal communities or are seeking to support evaluations with tribal populations. The primary audience for this series of briefs is federal program staff and leadership who work with tribes or tribal organizations or manage tribally focused grant programs. Each brief concludes with takeaways for program staff and leadership. The information presented may also be of interest to policy makers, researchers, and academics working in the broader human services field.


Virtual and Remote Screening Info Session (video)

Virtual & Remote Screening Info Session (video)

In this 7-minute info session TEI shares considerations for adapting the administration of a screener in a virtual setting and provides examples of virtual formats that program staff can use with clients.


New resources for conducting screenings during the COVID-19 pandemic

New resources for conducting screenings during the COVID-19 pandemic

As programs transition their services to virtual visits during the COVID-19 pandemic, many are grappling with the challenge of conducting screenings and assessments within this context. TEI has developed four resources to support programs in transitioning to virtual and remote screenings.

Virtual & Remote Screening Info Session

In this 7-minute info session TEI shares considerations for adapting the administration of a screener in a virtual setting and provides examples of virtual formats that program staff can use with clients.

Virtual Screening Decision Flow Chart

The flow chart is a one-stop shop for working through the key considerations associated with moving a screener to a virtual or remote format. It was designed by TEI for tribal home visiting grantees but can be adapted to other human service programs.

Virtual Screening Plan

The screening plan is a worksheet to help teams respond to key questions and document their decisions for moving a screener to a virtual or remote format.

Virtual and Remote Screenings tip sheet cover

Virtual Screening Tip Sheet

This tip sheet provides a summary of the considerations and key information shared in the Virtual & Remote Screening Info Session.


TEI creates a collection of parenting stress and resilience literature

The Tribal Evaluation Institute (TEI) compiled published articles (n=33) related to parenting stress and resilience from peer-reviewed journals for Tribal Home Visiting grantees. Implementation and Expansion Grantees (Cohort 2) can use this literature to inform rigorous local program evaluations focused on these topics. The articles summarized in the collection are specific to parenting stress and/or resilience in the context of home visiting or among American Indian and Alaska Native communities. This Excel resource identifies the following information for each included article (as applicable) –

  • Purpose of the paper
  • Relevant definitions
  • Main findings/conclusions
  • Research/evaluation question(s)
  • Target population
  • Study design
  • Intervention
  • Relevant measures/tools
  • Link to the article

You can download the Excel resource here.


TEI Publishes Tribal Home Visiting Grantee Evaluation Plan Profiles on OPRE Website

The Tribal Evaluation Institute (TEI) created a compilation of Tribal Home Visiting Program evaluation plan profiles that introduce and describe the grantees’ evaluation studies. The profiles are designed for evaluators, program implementers, and federal staff interested in program impact in complex community contexts and may be most useful for individuals thinking about evaluating tribal home visiting and/or early education initiatives. They can be used as resources for the development and implementation of future evaluations in tribal communities, as well as to inform evaluation-related policies and grant requirements for tribal funding recipients. Each grantee profile presents a description of the program, a summary of their evaluation plan, and information about their evaluation team.

You can view the published report on the OPRE website.


TEI Contributes to Special Issue of the Infant Mental Health Journal

Staff from the Tribal Evaluation Institute (TEI) project worked closely with Tribal Home Visiting grantees, ACF, and the Tribal Early Childhood Research Center (TRC) to contribute to five articles in the May/June 2018 volume of the Infant Mental Health Journal titled, “New Directions in Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting: Lessons Learned from the Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program.” The published articles include:

  • Building evaluation partnerships with tribal communities for home visiting (Ayoub, et al.)
  • Methodological considerations for home-visiting research in tribal communities (Kilburn, et al.)
  • Performance measurement in Tribal Home Visiting: Challenges and opportunities (Morales, et al.)
  • Measurement issues in home visiting research within tribal communities: Challenges and strategies (Rumbaugh Whitesell, et al.)
  • Approaches to the evaluation of cultural adaptations of home visiting in tribal communities (Meyer, et al.)

This journal issue represents the first time tribal home visiting efforts were the focus of a special issue.


Grantee Led Evaluations in Tribal MIECHV

Grantee-Led Evaluations in the Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program:

A Compilation of Grantee Evaluation Plan Profiles

In 2018, TEI created a compilation of Tribal Home Visiting Program grantees’ evaluation plan profiles that introduce and describe the grantees evaluation studies. The profiles are designed for evaluators, program implementers, and federal staff who are looking to assess program impact in complex community contexts and may be most useful for individuals thinking about evaluating tribal home visiting and/or early education initiatives. They can be used as resources for the development and implementation of future evaluations in tribal communities, as well as to inform evaluation-related policies and grant requirements for tribal funding recipients. Each profile presents a description of the program, a summary of their evaluation plan, and information about their evaluation team. Grantees reviewed, provided feedback, and approved their Evaluation Plan Profiles. Grantees also received local approval for the dissemination of these profiles, as desired by their community.

Click here to access and download the compilation.


CITATION:

Roberts, E., Morales, J., Salvador, M., Lyon, K., Geary, E., & Buckless, B. (2018). Grantee-led evaluations in the Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: A compilation of grantee evaluation plan profiles, OPRE Report # 2018-107, Washington, DC: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.